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One thing I am most not emphatically fond of about the new house: the… 
1st-Jun-2009 07:09 am
species
One thing I am most not emphatically fond of about the new house: the gas stove and oven. I'm sorry, open flames belong outside, not in my kitchen.

I'll adjust. It's just going to take some getting used to. I've had electric the entirety of 32 years, save the 6 months or so I lived in downtown San Jose in the crazy not-quite-a-commune, and I avoided cooking in that kitchen as much as humanly possible. (Gas stove that you had to light with one of those long campfire lighter thingies).

(Please, no gas versus electric holy war in comments. I know this is something that people feel strongly about. :p)
Comments 
1st-Jun-2009 12:00 pm (UTC)
Funny, I've been coveting one of these since we just used the mini model at our B&B: Aga range. They're always on. Aside from the energy cost of such a thing, drool.

Can't wait to hear more about your new house!
1st-Jun-2009 09:15 pm (UTC)
I would so have one if my house were a tad bit farther north. Like, in Canada. Then I'd have it on all winter long. My husband would probably sleep on it.
1st-Jun-2009 01:34 pm (UTC)
Hehe. No holy war from me, just a couple of tips from someone who had never even seen a working gas stove for 26 years before moving into her current apartment.

1. The drawer underneath the oven? That's probably not a drawer. Don't put your cookie sheets there. That's most likely a dedicated broiler. We don't use ours very often but at least Dan doesn't have to double-check it before it gets turned on to take out whatever I absentmindedly put there without thinking about it anymore. Also, be careful when it's open to not trip on it. This would be bad if it was turned off and cold, and worse if it was turned on. (I think that's the biggest reason I don't use it -- I'm paranoid about me or Valor stepping on it while it's open and hot.)

2. If the power goes out? Your stove will probably still work, you'll just have to make Jeff manually light it. We lost power for my whole birthday weekend in a really bad windstorm a couple of years back, and the only thing that still worked in our house was the hot water heater and the stove. I took six showers a day to stay warm and had grilled cheese cooked in the dark for my birthday dinner.

I will say it wasn't too hard to get used to, for me, and it IS really nice to not have to move the pan off the burner when you need to take it off the heat, because when you turn off the fire, the heat stops.
2nd-Jun-2009 01:48 am (UTC)
I would totally have tried to put my cookware in there.
1st-Jun-2009 01:50 pm (UTC)
I really, really want a gas stove, for the instant-heat (and instant-no-heat) reason. I'm hating the glass-top stove because it's the opposite, takes forever to heat and even longer to cool. But, I've only ever used electric, so I'm not sure if I would hate it for some other reason. Kinda scary, but I figure people have been using them for a long time, it can't be that bad...
2nd-Jun-2009 01:49 am (UTC)
Yea, the kinda-scary competes with the "plenty of other people use them" reaction.

And we had one of those flattop glass stoves in Seattle. PITA to clean. =/
1st-Jun-2009 03:41 pm (UTC)
Having fire in your house can be kind of scary until you get used to it, but once you do, you will probably love it. It's so nice to cook on - you can vary the temperature easily and quickly, and it gets hotter, which is nice for searing, and you can really control simmer vs. rolling boil, etc. etc. And it's way less expensive than electricity. Give it a chance! Gas stove is on my short list of must-haves for my house! I did grow up with it, though, and I find electrcity very frustrating to cook on.
2nd-Jun-2009 01:51 am (UTC)
Oh, I'm totally going to give it a chance; I don't have much choice. :) (though I have to admit, my crockpot is looking mighty good. ;) )
1st-Jun-2009 03:45 pm (UTC)
Yeah, I worry about burning my sleeves. My new stove has deeper burners than your typical gas stove, so I feel BETTER, but yeah. Still scary!

And ugh, I feel your pain on the forgetting things.
1st-Jun-2009 04:10 pm (UTC)
It can definitely be a little scary if you're not used to it. I highly recommend you research (read the manual, talk to the landlord/maintenanceperson, check online) the particular make and model of yours so you know how it works and what to do in the unlikely event it does something unexpected. Poke at it a bit, lift the cover, see what's where, etc.--just get familiar with it. Remember that the most significant danger isn't the flame, but the gas: if there's gas coming out with no flame, make sure there is adequate ventilation and know how to make the flame go again (relighting the pilot or the burner(s)) or to turn off the gas at the stove if you can't. And if none of that works, leave the house and call a professional--but it's unlikely you'll ever have to deal with it getting to that point.

I've lived with gas stoves most of my life and I'm not worried about ours, but I still make it a part of the pre-bedtime ritual to make sure it's off: lock the doors, shut the windows that need to be shut, check the stove, turn off the lights.

Man, the LBTI's gas stove was a monstrosity, but it wasn't even the scariest part of that kitchen, or the house in general. *shudder* I was more worried about electrical fires.
1st-Jun-2009 04:14 pm (UTC)
Excerpt from Wikipedia:

The Heat Wars were a series of Gas vs Electric military campaigns waged by much of Latin Europe. The specific crusades to regain control of the Holy Land (where gas range tops were plentiful and central heating was assumed) were fought over a period of nearly 200 years, between 1095 and 1291. Other campaigns in Spain and Eastern Europe continued into the 15th century. The Heat Wars were fought mainly against electric stoves, although campaigns were also waged against electric water heaters, furnaces, radiators, space heaters, and even some small skirmishes with hot plates. Crusaders took vows and were granted an indulgence for past sins of coveting electric means of heating.


See! Years of religious doctrine has ingrained in me the simple truth that gas is the only true path. Repent now your heretic electric ways heathen!
1st-Jun-2009 06:26 pm (UTC)
Little-known fact: the Heat Wars were actually a series of 10 Crusades done by the Gas faction. Well, 9. The 7th Crusade got bogged down in Holland on their way to war and got side-tracked attempting to eliminate the Wind heretics. As a result, they never made it to the Gas-Electric front.

This is sometimes called the Windgensian Crusade.
1st-Jun-2009 05:35 pm (UTC)
Yeah, when I moved in here it took me MONTHS to get used to the gas water heater. (I have gas furnace too, but for some reason not stove.) Every time it ignited my hind-brain yelled "FIRE!!!" because there's really nothing else like the sound of a flame igniting.

I still hate lighting the pilot to the furnace. Every time I do it I think I'm gonna blow up my house.
2nd-Jun-2009 01:52 am (UTC)
I am so glad I'm not the only person with that kind of hind-brain reaction to gas and fire. :)
2nd-Jun-2009 02:04 am (UTC)
Oh no, totally not. I house-sat for a dog, and didn't cook anything that wasn't microwaveable the entire weekend because I was too scared to light the stove. And that was a stove with auto-ignition -- no lighter required.

I finally got over the hot water heater thing by thinking about hot showers and hot baths every time I heard the flame start.
1st-Jun-2009 06:27 pm (UTC)
But... FIRE! :)
1st-Jun-2009 08:55 pm (UTC)
I'm sorry, open flames belong outside, not in my kitchen.

...

Please, no gas versus electric holy war in comments. I know this is something that people feel strongly about.

uh-huh.

...WHBT? WHL!

peace,

--me
1st-Jun-2009 09:17 pm (UTC)
I will tell you what made me relax about it the first time I was faced with a gas stove. A BIG BOX OF SALT. With the top already open. That'll quell any fire it might think about spreading. Also, fire extinguishers are cheap piece of mind.
2nd-Jun-2009 01:54 am (UTC)
The salt is a fantastic idea. The fire extinguisher is currently down in the basement; it should be relocated.
6th-Jun-2009 12:57 pm (UTC)
These are the types of things that make me glad I found a nice fireman to love me. If I must have fire in the house at least I feel safe :)
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